Zoo Babies! New Baby Animals Born in the Zoo – Monthly Updates | Tanganyika Wildlife Park

Did you know that the zoo is a great place to see new baby animals? Every month, we welcome new adorable baby animals. These little creatures are often some of the cutest animals in the world, and it’s definitely worth taking a trip to your local zoo to check them out! From llamas to cheetahs, there is something for everyone in this blog post. 

Pictures and descriptions of some of the cutest animals in the zoo are included below.

Be sure to check back often, as we’ll be updating this post regularly.

 

Click here and meet the babies, they are growing fast so buy your tickets now!

Baby Mandrill with her Mom at the Wichita Zoo

“Mama mandrill has a new baby and it’s absolutely adorable!”

On August 3rd, a new baby mandrill was born at the Wichita zoo. The proud parents are Iris and Dimitri with sister Olympia joining them in celebration of this wonderful event! This is only one example that shows how important it can be to protect species such as this, listed as Vulnerable on the International Union for Conservation of Nature’s Red List of Endangered Species.

 

Wichita zoo new baby penguins were born between April and August 2022

African Penguins are Trouble Makers!

Four newly hatched African Penguin chicks are doing well. They’re growing steadily in their home at the Trouble Maker’s Cove, where more than 30 penguins swim and make a lot of noise! Why they get called “jackass” means that these little guys communicate through honking or donkey-like brays when excited (which can be often). Learn more about Tanganyika’s successful breeding of African Penguins.

 

Born to parents Lily and Nico here at Tanganyika Wildlife Park, these baby lemurs are just over a month old and starting to get adventurous by climbing and jumping on new things (including their keepers).

 

Say hello to our new black-and-white ruffed lemur twins! 

Born to parents Lily and Nico here at Tanganyika Wildlife Park, these babies are just over a month old and starting to get adventurous by climbing and jumping on new things (including their keepers).

If you look closely, the best way to tell them apart is that one has a perfect heart shape on its forehead in white!

Unlike ring-tailed lemurs, when black and white ruffed lemurs are born, the mother will leave them in a nest until she has to move them. She will then carry them in her mouth, unlike the ringtails that will carry their young on their front sides!

Make sure you stop to see them next time you are visiting the park!

 

 

Born on Easter of 2022, this little lady is full of the zoomies (or jumpies) and is slowly learning to be out in the field with her herd.

Say hello to our Easter Springbok baby!

Born on Easter of 2022, this little lady is full of the zoomies (or jumpies) and is slowly learning to be out in the field with her herd.

When she was born, it was decided that she would be hand-raised because her springbok mother was not able to provide her with proper care. Thankfully, our amazing staff has been doing a great job ensuring she gets appropriate nutrition and attention to one day be introduced back into the main habitat.

According to one of her favorite keepers, Amanda, she loves grabbing large pieces of hay and just carrying them around in her mouth! She also likes to run throughout the springbok stalls, so you might hear her frolicking and making noises from nearby.

 

What’s cuter than Valentino and baby gibbon Cadbury sharing a snuggle in today’s rainy weather?!

New baby in the zoo – Cadbury the little gibbon

What’s cuter than Valentino and baby Cadbury sharing a snuggle in today’s rainy weather?!

Female gibbons give birth to a single baby once every two to three years, after a seven-month gestation period. The baby gibbons cling tightly to their mother’s midsection, refusing to let go. Their grip is strong, and it’s almost as if they’re using their mother as a belt to secure themselves.

Did you know that the color of their fur is not determined by their gender? Instead, it is a genetic trait passed down from their parents, just like hair color in humans! 

While you can see Gibbons walking on two feet like humans, these apes are known for the graceful way they swing from tree to tree using their long arms, moving at speeds of up to 34 miles per hour!

 

Baby animals in the zoo - Clouded Leopard born in March
Born in March, the cubs love to wrestle with each other and their toys and are still learning how to eat from a bowl without making a mess!

Baby animals in the zoo – Clouded Leopard born in March

The clouded leopards such as this one are from two different litters, both born in March. They love to wrestle with each other and their toys and are still learning how to eat from a bowl without making a mess!

Catch one of our littles through the nursery window next time you are visiting the park!

Five things our clouded leopard cubs love:

  1. Milk
  2. Stuffed Animals
  3. Their Keeper, Karen
  4. Cuddling
  5. Sleeping

Click here to learn how Tanganyika helps save and sustain Clouded Leopards.

 

Meet the newest addition to the De Brazza’s monkey family here at Tanganyika Wildlife Park! Right now he spends the majority of his time nursing and sleeping. In a couple of months, he will be bouncing all over his habitat alongside his brother Dave!

Baby De Brazza monkey at Tanganyika

IT’S A BOY! Meet the newest addition to the De Brazza’s monkey family here at Tanganyika Wildlife Park!

Born on April 8th, this little fella is full of curiosity but can still be seen clinging to his mom. Although right now he spends the majority of his time nursing and sleeping, in a couple of short months he will be bouncing all over his habitat alongside his brother, Dave!

De Brazza monkeys are part of the Old World monkeys, a family of monkeys that live in Africa and Asia. De Brazza monkeys have a habit of holding food in their cheek pouches, like squirrels and chipmunks!

 

Meet our newest addition, a baby alpaca – she’s just a few days old and so adorable you won’t be able to resist her charms.

Which is the cutest, an alpaca or a llama?

Come to Tanganyika Wildlife Park and find out! We have both, plus lots of other cool animals. Our newest addition is a baby alpaca – she’s just a few days old and so adorable you won’t be able to resist her charms.

 

Meet this beautiful Javan Langur baby monkey, a species of Old World monkey native to the island of Java.

New Baby Monkey Alert – Javan Langur

Meet this beautiful Javan Langur baby monkey, a species of Old World monkey native to the island of Java. Javan Langur infants are born with the bright orange pumpkin color coat as shown in the photo – but as they age, their coat will gradually darken to either black or an orange/brown color.

Today, this species is listed as vulnerable with a continuous decrease in population due to rainforest degradation, fragmentation, deforestation, hunting, and illegal pet trade. That’s a lot of threats!

Meet the Javan Langur family by clicking here.

 

Tanganyika Wildlife Park White Tiger Cub 2022
Tanganyika Wildlife Park White Tiger Cub 2022 at Kansas zoo

White Tiger Cub

On April 29th, 2022, we welcomed a new white tiger cub to our Tanganyika Wildlife Park family – and he’s already stealing the hearts of many! This spunky 3-month-old is spending time adjusting to his new home here in Kansas and preparing to meet you!

Click here for more pictures of our beautiful baby tiger

 

We have the joy of announcing that we recently welcomed our new reticulated giraffe calf born at TWP.

Meet our newly born reticulated giraffe calf

We have the joy of announcing that we recently welcomed our new reticulated giraffe calf born at TWP. There are four main species of giraffes (Masai, Northern, Southern, and Reticulated), though here at Tanganyika you will find our herd of Reticulated giraffes as you walk through the gates. 

Giraffes usually have one calf, though some giraffes can have twins in rare cases. Breeding giraffes is an important part of conservation as it increases genetic diversity to ensure a healthy reticulated giraffe population.

Learn how Tanganyika helps global giraffe conservation here.

 

We have had several baby goats born in the last weeks and they are soooo cute!

Baby Goats or “kids” at Tanganyika Wildlife Park

We have had several baby goats born in the last weeks and they are soooo cute!

When a pregnant mama Goat is kidding, she isn’t playing a practical joke. She is actually giving birth. Baby goats are called “kids”. Goats are the only baby animals that are called a kid.

 

When baby ring-tailed lemurs are born, they will hang onto their moms stomach and make their way to riding on her back over time.

 

BABY ANNOUNCEMENT! TWIN ring-tailed lemurs born at the park

Born to parents Cersie and Errol on March 15th, these littles are already very curious and beginning to wander from mom!

When baby ring-tailed lemurs are born, they will hang onto their mom’s stomach and make their way to riding on her back over time.

While you can’t yet feed the babies, you can feed Errol on Lemur Island because he now lives with bachelor group one! You can easily spot him because he is the one with the short tail.

 

Meet baby girl, Olympia. From parents Iris and Dimitri.

Little Olympia, the Baby Mandrill

The Tanganyika Wildlife Park conservation team would like to officially announce our latest birth—a baby Mandrill. Our female Mandrill, Iris, gave birth to a beautiful baby girl, Olympia. 

Mandrills are the largest species of monkey, and their colorful faces and unique expressions are easily recognizable. In the wild, African Mandrills may live about twenty years. However, captive Mandrills live much longer, sometimes up to 40 years old, with our protection.

Here you can learn more about the Mandril family at Tanganyika.

 

Here at Tanganyika Wildlife Park, we are home to 15 Snow Leopards. Snow leopards are solitary animals, so that means they like to live by themselves and have their own space.

Snow Leopards Cubs – preserving this elusive big cat

Here at Tanganyika Wildlife Park, we are home to 15 Snow Leopards. Snow leopards are solitary animals, so that means they like to live by themselves and have their own space. 

Snow Leopards are listed as Vulnerable by the IUCN with only about 4,500 left in the wild. Over the past 16 years, their population has declined by a whopping 20%! 

This is due to a few different reasons. It is averaged that a snow leopard is killed every day (250-450 per year). Not only is their fur highly sought after to make warm clothing, their bones are also used in traditional medicine. Moreover, as farmers move their livestock into snow leopard territory a few more problems arise. The livestock overgrazes the land which causes the snow leopards’ main prey (wild sheep and goats) to starve or move further away. With prey gone, snow leopards are forced to find a new source of food, livestock. With farmers defending their livelihood, it usually results in the killing. The last major reason for this decline in the snow leopard population is climate change. 

With the help of breeding programs throughout the world, we are able to preserve this elusive big cat. Tanganyika is one of those places. 

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